Children Never Say Goodbye

This is my last blog post for November. For this one, I have chosen an easy poem to understand – this is because I think some of our students here in Japan are also interested in reading some of my writing.

This poem is inspired by my friend Lily, the last time I saw her this summer. She’s four (nearly five now), and when I came to Japan, I didn’t see her for four or five months. When I came back, she didn’t hug me, or kiss me, or even say anything special. She just wanted me to play a game with her. For her, it was easier to imagine I’d never left. But then, after 3 days, I left again:

Children Never Say Goodbye

Children hate to say goodbye,
They think that if they don’t,
the leaving friend will have to stay,
but (by and large) they won’t.

Perhaps their attitude is right
for other reasons though,
for if you never say “Goodbye”,
or “Sad to see you go”;

don’t mark the change from here to there
from near to far to gone,
just “see ya” is enough for me,
“I’ll see you later on,”

this may sometimes feel like a lie,
but then, you wait and see,
sometimes the days and months just fly
before more you and me.

It’s not my best poem, but it is simple, and it rhymes, and I like it.

Also, here’s my last haiku for the month. It’s getting cold here (though of course not as cold as England), and sometimes I see the big plastic ice cream cones outside shops:

Funny now to think
of those hot summer days when
I lived for ice cream.

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Aunt Wendy’s New Home

Every break from class
I rush to the computer
and pray for wickets.

 

Hey all. It’s getting towards the end of the month and there’s only two posts up. Why? Well, excuses are lovely things, but the only one worth spouting is it’s the dreaded time of year where I have to write reports, and while they’re not too onerous a task, they’re mind-sapping.

courtesy of bbc.co.uk/sport

The above haiku was a silly one I threw together about today. For the first time, well, ever, I’m making the effort and paying attention to the Ashes (giant up-to-25-day cricket competition between the best two teams, England and Australia). This was written during a day of Australia batting, of course.

Before we get to the story, I’m making a new Category in the side called “Haiku”. I know Haiku are poems too, but I’m going to class them differently so it’s easier to find the haiku if you’re looking for them.

So, I’ve got some Flash Fiction for you today. It is, strangely, a sequel to Tomatoes, although that’s not apparent by any character names, or by the narrative voice, or location…. or anything. It has the same source material; my grandmother, telling me stories from when her grandchildren were just little. She has a natural gift for storytelling, and perhaps this has something to do with her being born a Ridgwell (there, the “original” spelling of my pen name). It’s called:

Aunt Wendy’s New Home

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You don’t remember? Well, this story is the type you always liked the best – it’s one about you.

Continue reading “Aunt Wendy’s New Home”

Bits and Pieces

You’ve finished your book;
that alone is proof to me
that time is passing.

Hey guys.

The above haiku is one I wrote a month or so ago, and I was quite fond of it. I still am, but now I find it strange that, when re-reading it, it seems to have a different emotion to the one I had when I wrote it. I suppose the difference is it at what moment time stops – either it’s an endless bore or an endless pleasure. So perhaps that’s the reason I’m so fond of it, because one of the ways I identify a good poem is that it says different things to different people – well, this one says two different things to one person, so that’s got to be a good start.

This week has been a slower week for writing because Continue reading “Bits and Pieces”

Prayer Hands

Through bright maple cliffs
we hear the white water rush;
Mist hides those dark falls.

Kegon Falls Mountainside

I decided this month that attempting the NaNoWriMo while working a full day and a full week would be a little bit too hard for me, not to mention cutting into valuable recuperation / exploration time. Instead, I’ve set a more reasonable goal – 4 posts minimum in this fine month of November. And each post must have at least one haiku as well as its other content. Hence the above haiku, constructed (I believe that’s the correct verb) while visiting Nikko last weekend. I did eventually see the waterfalls (one of Japan’s Top Three, like almost everything in Japan) when the clouds parted, but while that’s poetic, it wouldn’t fit into 3 lines.

Continue reading “Prayer Hands”